1. Plan

  2. Design

  3. Build

  4. Complete

Project Overview

Multimodal transportation upgrades to Lehigh Street will help improve safety for students traveling to nearby schools and everyone walking or bicycling this north-south corridor.

Construction of the first phase of improvements (pedestrian crossing treatments and paved multi-use path) is expected to start at the end of February 2022 (weather permitting) and to continue through April. During construction, Lehigh will remain open, and bicyclist and pedestrian detours will be provided around the construction.

Visit Cone Zones for all current construction and traffic impacts.

What are the changes planned for Lehigh Street? (as of 12/2/21)

  • Pedestrian crossing and intersection safety improvements near Mesa Elementary (Q1 2022)
  • Installation of a paved multi-use path through Bear Creek Park connecting Lehigh and Bear Creek Elementary (Q1 2022)
  • Resurfacing of Lehigh/Greenbriar between Table Mesa and east of Galena/Redstone (Q2/Q3 2022)
  • Installation of a bike lane with a painted buffer between Table Mesa Drive and Cragmoor Road (Q2/Q3 2022)

View the map of planned changes

Map of Lehigh Improvements

Frequently Asked Questions

This is a Safe Routes to School and Vision Zero project designed to make Lehigh Street a lower traffic-stress travel corridor to improve comfort and safety for students traveling to nearby Bear Creek and Mesa elementary schools as well as all people who use this popular thoroughfare to travel in southwest Boulder. The project includes adding new pedestrian crossings near Mesa Elementary and a paved multi-use path through Bear Creek Park. It also includes adding a buffered bike lane and resurfacing the pavement through the city’s new Vision Zero-Pavement Management program to further improve multimodal safety.

This project strategically combines funding from several sources to provide multimodal enhancements throughout the corridor. The pedestrian crossing and intersection safety improvements near Mesa Elementary and the multi-use path in Bear Creek Park are being funded by a grant from Safe Routes to School, a national program that aims to make it safer for students to walk and bike to school and encourage more walking and biking where safety is not a barrier. Funds for pavement resurfacing and the buffered bike lane come from the city’s Vision Zero Innovation Program, a new strategic initiative that incorporates planned multimodal safety improvements into regularly scheduled annual pavement resurfacing work. The funds for the grant local match are from the city’s Capital Improvements Program.

The project is taking place along Lehigh Street, from just east of Galena Way/Redstone Road to Table Mesa Drive. View this map for more details.

  • Pedestrian crossing and intersection safety improvements near Mesa Elementary: Q1 2022

  • Installation of a paved multi-use path through Bear Creek Park connecting Lehigh Street and Bear Creek Elementary: Q1 2022

  • Resurfacing of Lehigh between Table Mesa and east of Galena/Redstone: Q2/Q3 2022

  • Installation of a bike lane with a painted buffer between Table Mesa and Cragmoor: Q2/Q3 2022

This project is being led by the City of Boulder in partnership with the Boulder Valley School District (BVSD). The pedestrian enhancements are funded by a grant from Safe Routes to School, a national organization supporting safe travel to schools nationwide.

As called for in Boulder’s Transportation Master Plan, the city is building out its low-stress network for biking and walking across the city to provide safer routes for community members to get where they need to go. To do this, the city assessed streets for comfort and stress level through the Low-Stress Walk and Bike Network Plan and its related community engagement process. To be considered a low-stress street, pedestrian and bicycling facilities that reduce exposure to motor vehicle paths are recommended.

Lehigh Street was initially assessed to currently as a high-stress street for walking and bicycling in the city’s Low-Stress Walk and Bike Network Plan and was identified as needing multimodal improvements to be included in the city’s low-stress travel network. Lehigh Street was selected to become part of the city’s low-stress network because it is a popular north-south route that connects neighborhoods, schools, parks and OSMP trail access and is a main travel corridor for southwest Boulder. Improving multimodal travel safety on Lehigh is an important step toward creating a safer transportation system across Boulder and reaching our Vision Zero goal of eliminating serious injuries and deaths caused by traffic crashes.

To help make bicycling on the street lower-stress, the project includes installation of a buffered bike lane. Lehigh Street is scheduled to receive annual pavement resurfacing work in 2022, and the buffered bike lane will be installed following resurfacing. This is part of the city’s new Vision Zero-Pavement Management program that multimodal facility upgrades into annual pavement resurfacing work.

In addition, two elementary schools are located on or near Lehigh Street: Mesa Elementary and Bear Creek Elementary. More than 300 students bike to the Mesa, Bear Creek and Southern Hills schools, representing 26% of the schools’ enrollment, and many others walk, scooter, and skateboard. The city has heard from parents with students at Mesa and Bear Creek Elementary that Lehigh Street is difficult to cross and that a paved connection is needed through Bear Creek Park. The city partnered with BVSD to develop plans for the project and received funding from the national Safe Routes to School program.

As Lehigh Street is a popular north-south route, this project serves an important role in helping Boulder’s transportation system enable people of all ages and abilities to get where they want to go by foot or bike and creating safer streets for all.

The planned changes will make travel safer and more comfortable on Lehigh Street in several ways. First, the pedestrian crossing treatments will reduce the distance that people crossing the street are exposed to motor vehicles, reducing the risk of a collision. Second, the buffered bike lanes also offer more space dedicated for bicyclists and the buffers on both sides of the bike lanes reduce risk by providing greater separation from parked vehicle doors opening as well as from motor vehicle traffic in the travel lanes. Third, the paved multi-use path through Bear Creek will provide a safer crossing through the park, which is currently designated by informal mud trails.

Removal of the center turn lane is necessary to provide enough space for the planned buffered bike lane. Left turns will still be allowed from the travel lanes. Buffered bike lanes require additional footage space to ensure users are a safe distance from vehicular traffic. City staff have evaluated travel patterns on the Lehigh corridor and believe the safety benefits of adding the buffered bike lane outweigh possible impacts of not having a center turn lane in this location.

More than 300 students regularly bike to the Mesa, Bear Creek and Southern Hills schools, representing 26% of the schools’ enrollment.